LEARN TO SAY HELLO AND GOOD BYE IN SPANISH

December 31st, 2014 @

Learn the two ways  of greeting people in Spanish. One is called the FAMILIAR form used to address people you already know and the FORMAL form is used to address people you do not know or are meeting for the first time.

SALUDOS (greetings)
HOLA, BUENOS DIAS
HOLA, BUENAS TARDES
HOLA, BUENAS NOCHES

1.-GREETING IN SPANISH IN THE FAMILIAR FORM
the thing to remember is that tu and vosotros pronouns(as) are used to address people in the FAMILIAR form, to greet people you know.

  • Hola buenos dias, me llamo Mario y esta es Maria, ¿qué tal? [Hello, how are you?]
  • Buenos dias, bien, ¿y tú? [Fine and you?]
  • Bien, gracias [Fine, thank you]
  • ……………
  • Hola Maria, ¿qué tal? [Hello, how are you?]
  • Hola, Pedro, bien, ¿y tú? [Fine and you?]
  • Bien, gracias [Fine, thank you]
  • ……………
  • Hola Pedro, ¿cómo estás? [Hello, how are you?]
  • Muy bien, ¿y tú? [Very well, thank you]
  • Bien, gracias [Fine, thank you]
  • ……………
  • Adios [Goodbye]
  • Adios [Goodbye]

I am always doing things I can’t do; that’s how I get to do them. – Pablo Picasso

2.- GREETING IN SPANISH IN THE FORMAL FORM

The other thing to remember is that the usted and ustedes pronouns are used to greet people using the FORMAL WAY.

  • Hola buenas tardes, señor Smith le presento al señor  Pérez,[May I introduce you to Mr Pedro  Pérez] jefe del departamento de compras.
  • Mucho gusto, señor Pérez.
  • Mucho gusto, señor Smith.
  • ………………
  • Buenas tardes, este es el señor Javier Días [This is  Javier Días]
  • Mucho gusto señor Días.
  • ………………
  • Adios [Goodbye]
  • Adios [Goodbye]

These BBC Spanish videos would give you a great opportunity to practice your Spanish. Good luck.

see video Greetings

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About The Author

Ana Quetal is the founder of AnasClassroom. She provides a UK support for the GCSE Spanish exam. She is an expert Spanish teacher, an online Spanish tutor and she offers private tuitions via Skype to learn and practice conversational Spanish.

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Last 5 Posts by Ana Quetal

Spanish conversation and GCSE revison courses in January 2015 – January 3rd, 2014
who needs Spanish GCSE extra support – December 14th, 2013
A-LEVEL RESULTS AND SPANISH IS RISING IN POPULARITY – August 18th, 2011
GSCE MOTHERN LANGUAGES SPANISH RESULTS – August 18th, 2011
SPANISH GCSE AND FOUR PREPOSITIONS-EXPLANATION – August 3rd, 2011
– See more at: http://anasclassroom.com/?p=1009&preview=true#sthash.5jM9H0O9.dpuf


Spanish GCSE revision and conversation lessons online and at Harrow

January 3rd, 2014 @

 

Dear Students

Give the best start to 2015 by enrolling in one of our conversational Spanish courses for beginners, intermediate and advance levels and to our Spanish GCSE exams revision lessons.

Students are welcome to come to our conversational and revision classes to our premises in Harrow, close to Wembley, Edgware, Pinner and Stanmore or online via SKYPE.

All our students receive the personal support from our Spanish teachers trained to teach Spanish with  the latest teaching methods, helping their students to reach their full  learning potential.

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SPANISH GSCE A MODERN LANGUAGE COURSE VERY POPULAR AMONG STUDENTS.

August 18th, 2011 @

GCSE RESULTS
About 690,000 pupils from England, Wales and Northern Ireland received their GCSE results today and the pass rate rose for the 23rd year in a row.
The number of students taking foreign languages has dropped by a third since the government made them optional at GCSE six years ago. The decline of French has been striking; it has nearly halved to just over 170,000 entries compared with more than 300,000 in 2004, and fell out of the top 10 most popular subjects this year.
Spanish appears poised to overtake German at GCSE; with the numbers taking it rising to over 67,000 while German entries have fallen to around 70,000 this year. The numbers taking Mandarin, Portuguese and Polish have also risen, with the last thought to be fuelled by the increase in the number pupils who are children of recent Polish migrants.